Tracey Emin

Tracy Emin‘s ‘My Bed‘, part of the spurned Charles Saatchi collection, sells at auction to Jay Jopling at the White Cube Gallery for $4 million.

Jay originally sold it to Charles Saatchi for $300,000.  Why did Jay Jopling want it back so badly?  Sentimental?

No.  Buying and selling art at auction determines international prices for all gilt-edged (and emerging) artists.

The art market remains totally unregulated.  An audacious art market ploy,  it is an open secret that gallerists operate a cabal that controls bidding at auction, maintaining an artists credibility and in this case artificially inflating Tracey Emin’s waning prices.

This con is not illegal.

Transforming art of questionable value into work of capital value that can be tendered with the Inland Revenue.  Money laundering in plain sight until the ‘art work’ has an ersatz value all of its own… independent even of its secondary market value, it can then be offered to the State as an asset by its owner, in place of whatever they owe in taxes.  The Lucian Freud estate recently traded 15 million gbp worth of Art in lieu of death duties.

A foot note: Tracy hid in her bed for three days presumably on housing and other benefits. Benefits she received for 30 years. Benefits she, as a Tory, wants to deprive others.

Wanna read about the bed….

A consummate storyteller, Tracey Emin engages the viewer with her candid exploration of universal emotions. Well-known for her confessional art, Tracey Emin reveals intimate details from her life to engage the viewer with her expressions of universal emotions. Her ability to integrate her work and personal life enables Emin to establish an intimacy with the viewer.

Tracey shows us her own bed, in all its embarrassing glory. Empty booze bottles, fag butts, stained sheets, worn panties: the bloody aftermath of a nervous breakdown. By presenting her bed as art, Tracey Emin shares her most personal space, revealing she is as insecure and imperfect as the rest of the world.